1. The Gentrification Problem: The Environmental Crisis of Unaffordable Housing
  2. The Roots Run Deep: The Environmental Crisis of Unaffordable Housing
  3. There Is No Cost to Live: The Environmental Crisis of Unaffordable Housing
  4. Fixing Up Philly’s Homes: Charles Ellison for WHYY
  5. Punishment Past Prison Walls: Environmental injustice in the Carceral State
  6. RACISM IN THE WATER
  7. THE “INFLATION REDUCTION ACT” IS NOW LAW. SO, HOW DOES IT HELP BLACK PHILLY?
  8. PHILADELPHIA HAS AN AIR TOXIN PROBLEM. WHAT IS THE CITY GOVERNMENT GOING TO DO TO FIX IT?
  9. Want to end gun violence now? Let’s save Philly block by block
  10. Here are steps Philly could take to cool urban heat islands
  11. The gas prices conversation we should be having
  12. Reclaiming Black land is challenging but not impossible
  13. Black clergy: Churches can sway views on climate crisis
  14. Can old Philadelphia refineries be cleaned up and restored?
  15. Here’s how Black Philadelphia can help in the environmental justice battle
  16. City Launches Environmental Justice Advisory Commission
  17. FIXING THE STRUGGLE SPACE
  18. SOLAR POLICIES ARE FALLING BEHIND – SO, HOW DO WE CATCH UP?
  19. IS PHILLY’S “TAP” WATER PROGRAM WORKING?
  20. Ian Harris
  21. Melissa Ostroff
  22. THE WATER BILLS ARE WAY TOO HIGH
  23. THE KEY TO APPROACHING FRONTLINE COMMUNITIES ON ALL THINGS GREEN
  24. ICYMI: Watch highlights, panels at ecoWURD’s 2021 Environmental Justice Summit
  25. BLACK MOTHERS NEED CLEANER & SAFER ENVIRONMENTS – IT’S A PUBLIC HEALTH IMPERATIVE
  26. USING DANCE TO SAVE A RIVER
  27. TRACKING PHILADELPHIA’S AIR QUALITY
  28. GETTING RELIGIOUS ON CLIMATE CRISIS
  29. WE NEED MORE BLACK PEOPLE IN AGRICULTURE
  30. WHEN THERE’S NO CLEAN ENVIRONMENT, WE HAVE NOTHING
  31. A PREMATURE END TO EVICTION MORATORIUMS
  32. THE LACK OF BELIEF IN CLIMATE CRISIS IS JUST AS MUCH A THREAT
  33. YOU CAN’T HAVE RACIAL JUSTICE WITHOUT FAIR HOUSING
  34. RUN OVER THE SYSTEMS: THE FUTURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVISM
  35. PENNSYLVANIA IS “WAY BEHIND” ON SOLAR. HOW DOES IT CATCH UP?
  36. Pandemic Relief For Black Farmers Still Is Not Enough
  37. A BLUEPRINT FOR THE NEXT URBANISM
  38. THAT ELECTRONIC & CLOTHING WASTE PILES UP. SO WHERE TO PUT IT?
  39. THE WOMB IS THE FIRST ENVIRONMENT
  40. WILL THERE BE ANY MASS TRANSIT LEFT AFTER PANDEMIC?
  41. A FRIDGE FOR EVERYONE WHO’S HUNGRY
  42. OLD SCHOOL FOSSIL FUEL ECONOMY VS. NEW SCHOOL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY
  43. ENVIRONMENTAL INJUSTICE IS THE TOP SOCIAL JUSTICE PRIORITY
  44. IN 2020, DID “BIG GREEN” BECOME LESS WHITE?
  45. CLIMATE ACTION CAN POWER OUR RECOVERY
  46. IN PANDEMIC, AN HBCU DOES IT BETTER
  47. A DANGEROUS LACK OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE PROTECTIONS
  48. HOW FAST CAN A BIDEN PRESIDENCY MOVE ON CLIMATE ISSUES?
  49. CRAFTING A BLACK-DRIVEN CORONAVIRUS AND CLIMATE “STIMULUS” AGENDA
  50. Penn to donate $100 million to Philadelphia school district to help public school children
  51. BLACK ECOLOGIES IN TIDEWATER VIRGINIA
  52. WHAT IS “FROM THE SOURCE REPORTING?”
  53. LEADERSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
  54. THE ECOWURD SUMMIT LAUNCH
  55. National Geographic Virtual Photo Camp: Earth Stories Aimed to Elevate Indigenous Youth Voices
  56. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2020
  57. THE PLAN FOR A 100 PERCENT CLEAN FUTURE IS SAVING NATURE
  58. WHAT SHOULD A PRESIDENT’S ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AGENDA LOOK LIKE?
  59. THE NEED FOR ABOLITIONIST TEACHING
  60. PUBLIC LANDS & SAVING NATURE
  61. TOO MANY NATURAL GAS SPILLS
  62. GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK
  63. BLACK VOTERS ARE THE ECO-VOTERS CLIMATE ACTIVISTS ARE LOOKING FOR
  64. CANNABIS PROFIT & BLACK ECONOMY
  65. THE NATURE GAP
  66. BLACK PEOPLE NEED NATURE
  67. WHAT IS TREEPHILLY?
  68. IS AN OBSCURE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE IN HARRISBURG DOING ENOUGH?
  69. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM’S RACIST ROOTS
  70. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  71. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  72. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  73. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  74. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  75. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  76. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  77. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  78. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  79. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  80. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  81. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  82. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  83. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  84. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  85. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  86. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  87. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  88. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  89. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  90. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  91. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  92. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  93. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  94. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  95. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  96. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  97. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  98. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  99. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  100. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  101. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  102. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  103. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  104. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  105. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  106. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  107. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  108. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  109. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  110. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  111. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  112. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  113. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  114. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  115. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  116. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  117. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  118. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  119. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  120. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  121. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  122. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  123. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  124. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  125. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  126. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  127. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  128. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  129. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  130. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  131. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  132. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  133. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  134. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  135. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  136. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  137. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  138. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  139. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  140. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  141. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  142. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  143. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  144. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  145. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  146. Are You Going to Drink That?
  147. The Origins of ecoWURD
  148. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  149. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  150. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  151. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess
Monday, January 30, 2023
  1. The Gentrification Problem: The Environmental Crisis of Unaffordable Housing
  2. The Roots Run Deep: The Environmental Crisis of Unaffordable Housing
  3. There Is No Cost to Live: The Environmental Crisis of Unaffordable Housing
  4. Fixing Up Philly’s Homes: Charles Ellison for WHYY
  5. Punishment Past Prison Walls: Environmental injustice in the Carceral State
  6. RACISM IN THE WATER
  7. THE “INFLATION REDUCTION ACT” IS NOW LAW. SO, HOW DOES IT HELP BLACK PHILLY?
  8. PHILADELPHIA HAS AN AIR TOXIN PROBLEM. WHAT IS THE CITY GOVERNMENT GOING TO DO TO FIX IT?
  9. Want to end gun violence now? Let’s save Philly block by block
  10. Here are steps Philly could take to cool urban heat islands
  11. The gas prices conversation we should be having
  12. Reclaiming Black land is challenging but not impossible
  13. Black clergy: Churches can sway views on climate crisis
  14. Can old Philadelphia refineries be cleaned up and restored?
  15. Here’s how Black Philadelphia can help in the environmental justice battle
  16. City Launches Environmental Justice Advisory Commission
  17. FIXING THE STRUGGLE SPACE
  18. SOLAR POLICIES ARE FALLING BEHIND – SO, HOW DO WE CATCH UP?
  19. IS PHILLY’S “TAP” WATER PROGRAM WORKING?
  20. Ian Harris
  21. Melissa Ostroff
  22. THE WATER BILLS ARE WAY TOO HIGH
  23. THE KEY TO APPROACHING FRONTLINE COMMUNITIES ON ALL THINGS GREEN
  24. ICYMI: Watch highlights, panels at ecoWURD’s 2021 Environmental Justice Summit
  25. BLACK MOTHERS NEED CLEANER & SAFER ENVIRONMENTS – IT’S A PUBLIC HEALTH IMPERATIVE
  26. USING DANCE TO SAVE A RIVER
  27. TRACKING PHILADELPHIA’S AIR QUALITY
  28. GETTING RELIGIOUS ON CLIMATE CRISIS
  29. WE NEED MORE BLACK PEOPLE IN AGRICULTURE
  30. WHEN THERE’S NO CLEAN ENVIRONMENT, WE HAVE NOTHING
  31. A PREMATURE END TO EVICTION MORATORIUMS
  32. THE LACK OF BELIEF IN CLIMATE CRISIS IS JUST AS MUCH A THREAT
  33. YOU CAN’T HAVE RACIAL JUSTICE WITHOUT FAIR HOUSING
  34. RUN OVER THE SYSTEMS: THE FUTURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVISM
  35. PENNSYLVANIA IS “WAY BEHIND” ON SOLAR. HOW DOES IT CATCH UP?
  36. Pandemic Relief For Black Farmers Still Is Not Enough
  37. A BLUEPRINT FOR THE NEXT URBANISM
  38. THAT ELECTRONIC & CLOTHING WASTE PILES UP. SO WHERE TO PUT IT?
  39. THE WOMB IS THE FIRST ENVIRONMENT
  40. WILL THERE BE ANY MASS TRANSIT LEFT AFTER PANDEMIC?
  41. A FRIDGE FOR EVERYONE WHO’S HUNGRY
  42. OLD SCHOOL FOSSIL FUEL ECONOMY VS. NEW SCHOOL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY
  43. ENVIRONMENTAL INJUSTICE IS THE TOP SOCIAL JUSTICE PRIORITY
  44. IN 2020, DID “BIG GREEN” BECOME LESS WHITE?
  45. CLIMATE ACTION CAN POWER OUR RECOVERY
  46. IN PANDEMIC, AN HBCU DOES IT BETTER
  47. A DANGEROUS LACK OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE PROTECTIONS
  48. HOW FAST CAN A BIDEN PRESIDENCY MOVE ON CLIMATE ISSUES?
  49. CRAFTING A BLACK-DRIVEN CORONAVIRUS AND CLIMATE “STIMULUS” AGENDA
  50. Penn to donate $100 million to Philadelphia school district to help public school children
  51. BLACK ECOLOGIES IN TIDEWATER VIRGINIA
  52. WHAT IS “FROM THE SOURCE REPORTING?”
  53. LEADERSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
  54. THE ECOWURD SUMMIT LAUNCH
  55. National Geographic Virtual Photo Camp: Earth Stories Aimed to Elevate Indigenous Youth Voices
  56. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2020
  57. THE PLAN FOR A 100 PERCENT CLEAN FUTURE IS SAVING NATURE
  58. WHAT SHOULD A PRESIDENT’S ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AGENDA LOOK LIKE?
  59. THE NEED FOR ABOLITIONIST TEACHING
  60. PUBLIC LANDS & SAVING NATURE
  61. TOO MANY NATURAL GAS SPILLS
  62. GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK
  63. BLACK VOTERS ARE THE ECO-VOTERS CLIMATE ACTIVISTS ARE LOOKING FOR
  64. CANNABIS PROFIT & BLACK ECONOMY
  65. THE NATURE GAP
  66. BLACK PEOPLE NEED NATURE
  67. WHAT IS TREEPHILLY?
  68. IS AN OBSCURE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE IN HARRISBURG DOING ENOUGH?
  69. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM’S RACIST ROOTS
  70. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  71. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  72. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  73. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  74. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  75. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  76. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  77. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  78. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  79. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  80. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  81. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  82. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  83. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  84. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  85. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  86. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  87. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  88. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  89. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  90. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  91. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  92. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  93. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  94. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  95. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  96. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  97. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  98. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  99. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  100. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  101. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  102. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  103. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  104. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  105. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  106. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  107. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  108. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  109. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  110. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  111. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  112. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  113. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  114. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  115. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  116. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  117. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  118. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  119. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  120. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  121. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  122. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  123. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  124. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  125. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  126. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  127. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  128. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  129. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  130. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  131. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  132. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  133. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  134. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  135. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  136. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  137. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  138. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  139. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  140. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  141. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  142. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  143. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  144. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  145. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  146. Are You Going to Drink That?
  147. The Origins of ecoWURD
  148. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  149. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  150. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  151. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess

By Dylan Lewis | ecoWURD 

 

President Biden’s creatively named “Inflation Reduction Act” finally passed the Senate – then it passed the House both narrowly and by partisan margins. The bill was long awaited, causing divisions within Congress and, for a moment, within the Democratic Party itself as more “moderate” to conservative Democrats such as Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) were either critical of various aspects of the bill or demanded the deletion of key provisions. Compromises were made, with fossil fuel companies (thanks to Manchin) and private investment firms (thanks to Sinema) still winning out. Still the “IRA” – as it’s also known – ended up being the most significant U.S. government direct spend on climate crisis ever: nearly $400 billion. After much debate, the transformative history-making bill was signed into law.  

 

What Does It Mean?

But, most Americans are still confused: What does it all mean? While the IRA’s title may indicate something solely economic, one major aim of the bill is to introduce sweeping legislation in order to combat the climate crisis that we are facing. It also aims to make healthcare more accessible, reduce the federal deficit and to create jobs; both are goals that are deeply intertwined with the environment and in concert, it’s hoped the bill will hopefully improve the lives of many Americans.

 

What does this bill say exactly? ecoWURD looked into it to figure out exactly what it means for Black Philadelphians. According to the summary created by the Senate, the Inflation Reduction Act:

 

  • Expands Medicare benefits: that includes free vaccines (2023), $35/month insulin (2023) and capped out-of-pocket drug costs to an estimated $4,000 or less in 2024 and settling at $2,000 in 2025

 

  • Lowers energy bills: Cuts energy bills by $500 to $1,000 per year

 

  • Makes historic climate investment: Spends $385 billion on direct climate crisis response efforts with the goal of reducing carbon emissions by roughly 40% by 2030

 

  • Lowers health care costs: Saves the average enrollee $800/year in the ACA marketplace, allows Medicare to negotiate 100 drugs over the next decade, and requires drug companies to rebate back price increases higher than inflation

 

  • Creates manufacturing jobs: More than $60 billion invested will create millions of new domestic clean manufacturing jobs

 

  • Invests in disadvantaged communities: Cleaning up pollution and taking steps to reducing environmental injustice with $60 billion for environmental justice

 

  • Closes tax loopholes used by wealthy: A 15 percent corporate minimum tax (although, due to Sinema’s last minute infamous intervention, private equity investment firms avoided that), a 1 percent fee on stock buybacks and enhanced IRS enforcement by hiring 80,000 more IRS workers. 

 

  • Protects families and small businesses making $400,000 or less

 

But, What Do Black Folks Get Out of It? 

This bill is making some big promises to many communities affected deeply by the climate crisis, including those here in Philadelphia. We’ve seen the dramatic effects of climate change within our own city with the flooding of the Schuylkill and Vine Street expressways during hurricane Ida and, before that, there was the PES refinery fire. Philadelphia is also considered one of a few asthma capitals within the country, and it is predicted that Independence Hall could be underwater in the not too distant future as a result of sea level rise. This legislation is not just about combating climate change in Philadelphia, it is about our preservation as a city and ensuring hundreds of thousands of residents don’t end up being displaced.

 

As a predominantly Black city, the lives of Black Philadelphians are at the frontlines, anyway, considering how we tackle the climate crisis. Pollution from industry is highest in Black, brown, and low-income communities, putting us at risk for major hazardous catastrophes; food deserts leave these same communities at a loss for fresh fruit and vegetables and increases the risk of heart health issues; and predominantly Black neighborhoods such as Chester and Nicetown have been blatantly disrespected by policymakers as they have been used as dumping grounds and toxic waste sites. If this legislation has absolutely anything to do with environmental justice as it claims, there must be focus on Black communities within Philadelphia that have been sacrificed in the name of “industry” and “progress.”

 

While analyzing the IRA, we explored ways in which the new law will help more distressed, vulnerable and mostly Black communities in Philadelphia and places like it. Here’s what we came up with:

 

  • The expansion of medicare benefits will, potentially, lower health care costs. That makes the treatment of debilitating and chronic health issues caused by the environment such as asthma, certain cancers, heart issues, and others more accessible and affordable.

 

  • The reduction of carbon emissions will hopefully aid in slowing climate change on a global scale. The U.S. is the top carbon producing country in the world. Forcing it to reduce carbon emissions lessens the impact of hazardous climate disasters within our communities. Keep in mind: 40 percent of Black populations in the U.S. live in a climate impact zone or region. Those are places that experience the most direct impact from climate crisis, whether that’s hurricanes, droughts, heat waves, tornadoes or flooding.

 

  • There are many Black Philadelphians living at or beneath the poverty line. An increase in domestic clean manufacturing jobs within our city could offer economic benefits if jobs were catered specifically to these communities.

 

  • The closing of tax loopholes has the potential to stall developers in their quest for more gentrification. In slowing gentrification, we slow down the mass displacement of residents, mostly Black, who can’t afford rising rents, the rising costs of housing and the rising property taxes. The environmental effects of pollution from construction will lessen along with the destruction of Black community ecosystems and cultures.

 

  • Protections for family and small businesses could allow for more Black businesses creation and preservation. This expands the potential for economic mobility. In addition to this small Black-owned grocers, co-operative supermarkets, and restaurants could utilize this legislation to combat food insecurity within the city and more small green businesses could appear and provide new job opportunities within the community.

 

  • Finally, a key point of the law is the investment in clean-up of pollution in disadvantaged communities and fighting environmental injustices. Philadelphia is a city that needs these investments as racist and careless environmental decisions have had personal and community consequences for many Black residents.

 

Show Us The Money

 

These are optimistic outlooks for what the Inflation Reduction Act could bring to Philadelphia. However, with the positives we must consider how policy like this has historically failed Black communities time and time again.

 

It’s still unclear exactly how much money Philadelphia receives from this law and, also, the previously passed Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) that will directly benefit Black and marginalized communities. It may still be too early to tell how many IRA dollars flow into Philly since the law just passed. We’re starting to get a sense of the BIL dollars, however. Billy Penn recently produced a deep dive outlining hundreds of millions of dollars for citywide “improvement” projects, but we won’t know if these investments improve equity.

 

Philly could already receive an estimated $735 million in BIL funds for safer streets (pedestrian fatalities and injuries do disproportionately impact Black residents), electric car charging stations (the price of those are out of reach), airport enhancements, redesigning built environments and zero-emission SEPTA buses. But, the question remains: Do these improvements improve the quality of life for Black people in a place like Philadelphia? What do Black communities get out of it?

 

Environmental justice is deeply intertwined with public health, class, and the ongoing struggle for Black liberation. What this bill cannot do is try to be a band-aid for centuries of environmental inequity. For too long, the climate crisis has been separated from its very destructive effects on Black communities across the country.

 

If the IRA is a way to cover the ignorance and negligence of the local, state, and federal government rather than to create systemic change then it will not save anyone … save the egos of the elected officials who passed it and the special interests who helped write it. Comprehensive environmental reform must be truly committed to actively centering communities bearing the brunt of the climate crisis. Philadelphia is one of those key places where we can put this into practice.

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