1. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  2. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  3. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  4. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  5. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  6. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  7. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  8. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  9. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  10. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  11. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  12. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  13. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  14. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  15. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  16. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  17. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  18. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  19. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  20. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  21. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  22. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  23. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  24. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  25. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  26. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  27. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  28. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  29. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  30. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  31. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  32. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  33. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  34. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  35. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  36. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  37. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  38. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  39. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  40. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  41. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  42. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  43. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  44. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  45. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  46. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  47. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  48. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  49. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  50. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  51. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  52. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  53. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  54. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  55. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  56. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  57. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  58. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  59. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  60. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  61. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  62. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  63. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  64. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  65. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  66. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  67. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  68. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  69. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  70. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  71. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  72. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  73. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  74. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  75. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  76. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  77. Are You Going to Drink That?
  78. The Origins of ecoWURD
  79. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  80. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  81. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  82. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess
Thursday, August 13, 2020
  1. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  2. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  3. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  4. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  5. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  6. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  7. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  8. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  9. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  10. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  11. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  12. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  13. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  14. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  15. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  16. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  17. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  18. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  19. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  20. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  21. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  22. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  23. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  24. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  25. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  26. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  27. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  28. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  29. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  30. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  31. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  32. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  33. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  34. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  35. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  36. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  37. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  38. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  39. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  40. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  41. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  42. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  43. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  44. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  45. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  46. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  47. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  48. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  49. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  50. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  51. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  52. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  53. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  54. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  55. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  56. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  57. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  58. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  59. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  60. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  61. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  62. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  63. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  64. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  65. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  66. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  67. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  68. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  69. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  70. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  71. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  72. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  73. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  74. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  75. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  76. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  77. Are You Going to Drink That?
  78. The Origins of ecoWURD
  79. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  80. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  81. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  82. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess

By Phil Levin & Ian P. Davies | Guest Research | originally from The Conversation

Over the last decade, the U.S. has seen an average of 70,512 wildland fires every year, annually burning about 6.8 million acres. With climate change, scientists expect fires to become more frequent and more severe.

However, some people are more affected by these events than others. Our work, published on Nov. 2, shows that racial and ethnic minorities are significantly more vulnerable to the effects of these natural disasters. The results provide a new perspective on where resources to mitigate wildfire threats are best allocated.

We were inspired to study this question by Hurricane Katrina, the catastrophe that ripped through New Orleans in 2005. Black neighborhoods were located in the low-lying, less protected areas of the city, and many lacked the resources to evacuate safely. After the storm cleared, black-owned homes were three times more likely than their white counterparts to be in the flooded parts of the city, and to this day the city’s black population has not rebounded to pre-Katrina population levels.

Other research on floods and hurricanes has shown similarly disproportionate effects on minorities. We wondered if a similar phenomenon existed for wildfires.

This map shows wildfire potential, as determined by the U.S. Forest Service, by census tract. White lines on the map correspond to U.S. census tracts. The potential for an area to burn is calculated by considering factors such as burnable fuels on the landscape, vegetation, weather and historical fire activity. Ian Davies,CC BY

Using data from the U.S. Census, we created an index that characterizes a community’s ability to adapt to wildfires. For example, signs that a community is less able to adapt to a wildfire include a prevalence of older or younger individuals; high rates of poverty; and a high proportion of people who are not fluent English speakers. We then calculated this metric for more than 70,000 census tracts across the U.S. and combined the results with the area’s potential for wildfires, as modeled by the U.S. Forest Service.

Our analysis revealed that wildfire vulnerability is spread unequally across race and ethnicity. Although affluent white Americans are more likely to live in fire-prone areas, non-white communities in fire-prone areas appear less able to adapt to a wildfire event. Communities that are majority black, Hispanic or Native American are over 50 percent more vulnerable to wildfire compared to other communities. Native Americans in particular are six times more likely than other groups to live in the most vulnerable communities.

This map shows wildfire vulnerability by census tract. Wildfire vulnerability takes into account both landscape wildfire risk and socioeconomic factors in determining how likely an area is to adapt and recover from a wildfire. Ian Davies,CC BY

Overall, some 29 million Americans live with significant potential for wildfires. Land managers often prioritize areas with extreme wildfire potential for active management, regardless of the capacity of individuals to absorb and recover from a disaster. By including a community’s capacity to respond to wildfire, we highlight those places that may be less resilient to a wildfire’s catastrophic impacts.

How can land managers and policymakers use this information to more effectively combat the impacts of wildfire? Current efforts by agencies and NGOs have largely focused on reducing the risk of fire. But no matter how effective such management is, there will still be wildfires across the U.S. – they are a natural, indeed necessary, part of many ecosystems.

However, natural resource managers can further reduce vulnerability of people to fire by increasing the adaptive capacity of affected communities. There are already some services in place; for example, some state and county agencies have cost-sharing programs to help homeowners reduce fuels on their properties, while others offer educational programs to help communities adapt to wildfires. However, there is evidence that socially vulnerable populations are less likely to participate in these types of government programs.

Cultural differences may also affect preferences for fire management. For example, black Americans have shown more reluctance toward some fire management practices, such as prescribed burning, than their white counterparts.

All loss of life is tragic, and the devastation caused by property loss is terrible for all victims, no matter their race or ethnicity. Like some other scholars, we feel that it’s time to stop thinking of “natural” disasters as natural, and start thinking of them as the consequences of social, economic and political factors that make communities more vulnerable to ruin. Facing the rising risk of fires due to climate change, communities must make sure that emergency planning and mitigation strategies are inclusive of vulnerable minorities, so that no one is left behind.

PHIL LEVINis Professor of Practice in Environmental and Forest Sciences at the University of Washington

IAN P. DAVIES is an M.S. Candidate at the University of Washington

The Conversation