1. ICYMI: Watch highlights, panels at ecoWURD’s 2021 Environmental Justice Summit
  2. BLACK MOTHERS NEED CLEANER & SAFER ENVIRONMENTS – IT’S A PUBLIC HEALTH IMPERATIVE
  3. USING DANCE TO SAVE A RIVER
  4. TRACKING PHILADELPHIA’S AIR QUALITY
  5. GETTING RELIGIOUS ON CLIMATE CRISIS
  6. WE NEED MORE BLACK PEOPLE IN AGRICULTURE
  7. WHEN THERE’S NO CLEAN ENVIRONMENT, WE HAVE NOTHING
  8. A PREMATURE END TO EVICTION MORATORIUMS
  9. THE LACK OF BELIEF IN CLIMATE CRISIS IS JUST AS MUCH A THREAT
  10. YOU CAN’T HAVE RACIAL JUSTICE WITHOUT FAIR HOUSING
  11. RUN OVER THE SYSTEMS: THE FUTURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVISM
  12. PENNSYLVANIA IS “WAY BEHIND” ON SOLAR. HOW DOES IT CATCH UP?
  13. Pandemic Relief For Black Farmers Still Is Not Enough
  14. A BLUEPRINT FOR THE NEXT URBANISM
  15. THAT ELECTRONIC & CLOTHING WASTE PILES UP. SO WHERE TO PUT IT?
  16. THE WOMB IS THE FIRST ENVIRONMENT
  17. A FRIDGE FOR EVERYONE WHO’S HUNGRY
  18. OLD SCHOOL FOSSIL FUEL ECONOMY VS. NEW SCHOOL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY
  19. ENVIRONMENTAL INJUSTICE IS THE TOP SOCIAL JUSTICE PRIORITY
  20. IN 2020, DID “BIG GREEN” BECOME LESS WHITE?
  21. CLIMATE ACTION CAN POWER OUR RECOVERY
  22. IN PANDEMIC, AN HBCU DOES IT BETTER
  23. A DANGEROUS LACK OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE PROTECTIONS
  24. HOW FAST CAN A BIDEN PRESIDENCY MOVE ON CLIMATE ISSUES?
  25. CRAFTING A BLACK-DRIVEN CORONAVIRUS AND CLIMATE “STIMULUS” AGENDA
  26. Penn to donate $100 million to Philadelphia school district to help public school children
  27. BLACK ECOLOGIES IN TIDEWATER VIRGINIA
  28. WHAT IS “FROM THE SOURCE REPORTING?”
  29. LEADERSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
  30. THE ECOWURD SUMMIT LAUNCH
  31. National Geographic Virtual Photo Camp: Earth Stories Aimed to Elevate Indigenous Youth Voices
  32. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2020
  33. TOO MANY NATURAL GAS SPILLS
  34. GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK
  35. BLACK VOTERS ARE THE ECO-VOTERS CLIMATE ACTIVISTS ARE LOOKING FOR
  36. CANNABIS PROFIT & BLACK ECONOMY
  37. THE NATURE GAP
  38. BLACK PEOPLE NEED NATURE
  39. WHAT IS TREEPHILLY?
  40. IS AN OBSCURE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE IN HARRISBURG DOING ENOUGH?
  41. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM’S RACIST ROOTS
  42. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  43. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  44. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  45. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  46. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  47. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  48. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  49. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  50. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  51. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  52. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  53. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  54. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  55. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  56. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  57. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  58. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  59. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  60. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  61. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  62. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  63. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  64. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  65. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  66. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  67. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  68. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  69. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  70. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  71. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  72. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  73. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  74. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  75. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  76. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  77. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  78. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  79. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  80. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  81. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  82. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  83. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  84. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  85. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  86. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  87. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  88. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  89. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  90. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  91. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  92. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  93. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  94. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  95. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  96. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  97. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  98. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  99. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  100. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  101. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  102. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  103. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  104. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  105. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  106. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  107. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  108. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  109. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  110. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  111. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  112. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  113. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  114. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  115. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  116. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  117. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  118. Are You Going to Drink That?
  119. The Origins of ecoWURD
  120. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  121. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  122. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  123. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess
Friday, December 3, 2021
  1. ICYMI: Watch highlights, panels at ecoWURD’s 2021 Environmental Justice Summit
  2. BLACK MOTHERS NEED CLEANER & SAFER ENVIRONMENTS – IT’S A PUBLIC HEALTH IMPERATIVE
  3. USING DANCE TO SAVE A RIVER
  4. TRACKING PHILADELPHIA’S AIR QUALITY
  5. GETTING RELIGIOUS ON CLIMATE CRISIS
  6. WE NEED MORE BLACK PEOPLE IN AGRICULTURE
  7. WHEN THERE’S NO CLEAN ENVIRONMENT, WE HAVE NOTHING
  8. A PREMATURE END TO EVICTION MORATORIUMS
  9. THE LACK OF BELIEF IN CLIMATE CRISIS IS JUST AS MUCH A THREAT
  10. YOU CAN’T HAVE RACIAL JUSTICE WITHOUT FAIR HOUSING
  11. RUN OVER THE SYSTEMS: THE FUTURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVISM
  12. PENNSYLVANIA IS “WAY BEHIND” ON SOLAR. HOW DOES IT CATCH UP?
  13. Pandemic Relief For Black Farmers Still Is Not Enough
  14. A BLUEPRINT FOR THE NEXT URBANISM
  15. THAT ELECTRONIC & CLOTHING WASTE PILES UP. SO WHERE TO PUT IT?
  16. THE WOMB IS THE FIRST ENVIRONMENT
  17. A FRIDGE FOR EVERYONE WHO’S HUNGRY
  18. OLD SCHOOL FOSSIL FUEL ECONOMY VS. NEW SCHOOL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY
  19. ENVIRONMENTAL INJUSTICE IS THE TOP SOCIAL JUSTICE PRIORITY
  20. IN 2020, DID “BIG GREEN” BECOME LESS WHITE?
  21. CLIMATE ACTION CAN POWER OUR RECOVERY
  22. IN PANDEMIC, AN HBCU DOES IT BETTER
  23. A DANGEROUS LACK OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE PROTECTIONS
  24. HOW FAST CAN A BIDEN PRESIDENCY MOVE ON CLIMATE ISSUES?
  25. CRAFTING A BLACK-DRIVEN CORONAVIRUS AND CLIMATE “STIMULUS” AGENDA
  26. Penn to donate $100 million to Philadelphia school district to help public school children
  27. BLACK ECOLOGIES IN TIDEWATER VIRGINIA
  28. WHAT IS “FROM THE SOURCE REPORTING?”
  29. LEADERSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
  30. THE ECOWURD SUMMIT LAUNCH
  31. National Geographic Virtual Photo Camp: Earth Stories Aimed to Elevate Indigenous Youth Voices
  32. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2020
  33. TOO MANY NATURAL GAS SPILLS
  34. GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK
  35. BLACK VOTERS ARE THE ECO-VOTERS CLIMATE ACTIVISTS ARE LOOKING FOR
  36. CANNABIS PROFIT & BLACK ECONOMY
  37. THE NATURE GAP
  38. BLACK PEOPLE NEED NATURE
  39. WHAT IS TREEPHILLY?
  40. IS AN OBSCURE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE IN HARRISBURG DOING ENOUGH?
  41. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM’S RACIST ROOTS
  42. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  43. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  44. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  45. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  46. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  47. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  48. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  49. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  50. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  51. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  52. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  53. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  54. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  55. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  56. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  57. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  58. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  59. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  60. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  61. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  62. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  63. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  64. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  65. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  66. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  67. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  68. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  69. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  70. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  71. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  72. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  73. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  74. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  75. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  76. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  77. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  78. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  79. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  80. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  81. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  82. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  83. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  84. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  85. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  86. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  87. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  88. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  89. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  90. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  91. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  92. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  93. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  94. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  95. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  96. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  97. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  98. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  99. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  100. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  101. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  102. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  103. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  104. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  105. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  106. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  107. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  108. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  109. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  110. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  111. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  112. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  113. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  114. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  115. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  116. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  117. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  118. Are You Going to Drink That?
  119. The Origins of ecoWURD
  120. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  121. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  122. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  123. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess

An Overview of Just How Much Climate Change is a Factor in 2018

2018 has been a year of notable climate change-instigated disasters. It’s also one of the most caustic and consequential election years in modern memory. And with environmental calamities transfixed on seemingly every other headline in between the  melodrama in Washington and on the campaign trail, it would stand to reason that environmental issues would be front and center on the minds of voters.

Voters would have plenty to get concerned about with respect to the health of the planet. Heat waves impacted melted major cities as urban heat islands expanded, along with a spike in heat-related deaths. More than usual wildfires turned millions of acres into charred landscape. Hurricanes have become a back-to-back staple on the news cycle, pummeling key battleground states and ravaging entire communities. Incessant rRains and flooding have sparked renewed concerns that rising sea levels along the East Coast will arrive much sooner than anticipated.   

Topping all that: a hundred scientists convened by the United Nations warn that we’ve all got a decade to reverse it before the point of no return.

But does news of impending environmental doom move the electorate, especially during a midterm?  It’s unclear. Even as Hurricane Michael barreled through Florida, Georgia and Alabama this past week, the media chattering class seemed more obsessed with Kanye West visiting the White House than what this latest catastrophe – only a few weeks in the wake of Hurricane Florence – signified about the overall health of the planet. With all the key state and federal level races happening, there was no highlight from candidates of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, no effort to connect it with voter decision making.  Only President Trump’s inevitable skepticism of the report made news cycles before the week’s end – “Who drew it?” he asked. “Because I can give you reports that are fabulous and I can give you reports that are not so good.”

So, with less than 30 days left before the midterms, will the environment mobilize voters?

Gallup’s annual poll on the topic of climate change impact shows less than half (43 percent) of all Americans concerned that “global warming” will ever affect them.  That was back in March 2018 – still, it was also nearly six months after epic Hurricanes Harvey, Maria and Irma devastated places like Houston, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Around that same time, however, Quinnipiac found 69 percent of voters “very concerned” or “somewhat concerned” about climate change, with 62 percent concerned they “or a family member will be personally affected by” it.  And less than a quarter believe the U.S. is doing anything about it.

The last point is significant. Some polls are attempting to quietly assess how the American public is reacting to very aggressive Trump administration moves to reverse once normal (and progressive) policymaking on the environment.  In just the past year, President Trump has announced U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate treaty, gutted the Environmental Protection Agency by placing oil, coal, and other fossil-driven industry lobbyists in leadership positions, and the rollback of important coal, carbon and methane emission regulations originally created to reduce air pollution.

Most voters may see these issues as important, but there is no evidence they view them as immediate threats in need of prompt policy response. In terms of whether voters will head to the polls according to where candidates stand on the environment, it’s fairly clear they won’t.  Environmental issues rank 12th out of 17 issues driving voters, according to the Reuters/Ipsos daily tracking poll – roughly 3.6 percent; it was at a peak of 5.5 percent during the week ending September 23rd, a reflection of public reaction to Florence.

YouGov’s polling shows just half of voters identifying the environment as a “very important issue,” with an addition 32 percent signaling that it’s “somewhat important. 

And unlike the Reuters poll, the environment ranks better: 4th among 15 issues of “most important” to voters, just below healthcare, social security and the economy. (DON’T NEED CHART)

Ironically, a recent Elon University poll in the wake of Florence found overwhelming numbers of North Carolinians – Democrats and Republicans alike – believing climate change will personally impact them: 83 percent now feel climate change will have some sort of negative impact on coastal areas, among the hardest hit locations in North Carolina during Florence.  North Carolina was a major 2016 battleground state won by Trump, a very vocal climate change skeptic who’s called the notion of global warming a “hoax.”

Does any of that necessarily mean voters will be motivated by concerns over the environment?  Not necessarily, particularly when looking at the Reuters poll. Environmental concerns in the polls assessed are also primarily focused on climate change, as opposed to other pressing issues such as air and water quality.

In Pennsylvania, a major battleground state hosting both a gubernatorial race and a U.S. Senate race, the issue of the environment barely registers with voters in a September Franklin and Marshall poll: only 2 percent of voters claim that the environment will influence their vote for Governor, and 1 percent say the same in their vote for Senator.  Yet, environmental issues such as water quality, air quality and the construction of natural gas pipelines through major metropolitan centers in Pennsylvania loom as significant threats to quality of life in the state.

An April 2018 Change Research poll did explore the environment overall as a major issue, as 48 percent – a slim majority – of voters claimed Trump administration rollbacks of environmental regulations would influence their vote in the 2018 midterms.

But, is it a leading or driving reason pushing voters into the polls?  It’s difficult to say – what is clear is that the issue resonates based on party, regional placement, income and race.  Your party, where you live, how much you earn and your race could determine how much you perceive the environment impacting you and your community.   For example, as the most recent YouGov poll finds, Black voters are the most concerned demographic on the importance of the environment as an issue: 88 percent of Black respondents said the environment was either “very” or “somewhat important” to them compared to 80 percent of Whites and the same for Latino voters. Individuals making under $50,000 annually are the most concerned about the environment – at 85 percent – compared to 80 percent for individuals making up to $100,000 or more annually.  And it’s worth noting that these racial and income disparities in views on the environment also mirror the same gaps that are pronounced during environmental disasters.

(Next week: A closer look at the racial demographics of environmental concerns and advocacy)