1. Penn to donate $100 million to Philadelphia school district to help public school children
  2. BLACK ECOLOGIES IN TIDEWATER VIRGINIA
  3. WHAT IS “FROM THE SOURCE REPORTING?”
  4. LEADERSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
  5. THE ECOWURD SUMMIT LAUNCH
  6. National Geographic Virtual Photo Camp: Earth Stories Aimed to Elevate Indigenous Youth Voices
  7. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2020
  8. TOO MANY NATURAL GAS SPILLS
  9. GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK
  10. BLACK VOTERS ARE THE ECO-VOTERS CLIMATE ACTIVISTS ARE LOOKING FOR
  11. CANNABIS PROFIT & BLACK ECONOMY
  12. THE NATURE GAP
  13. BLACK PEOPLE NEED NATURE
  14. WHAT IS TREEPHILLY?
  15. IS AN OBSCURE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE IN HARRISBURG DOING ENOUGH?
  16. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM’S RACIST ROOTS
  17. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  18. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  19. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  20. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  21. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  22. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  23. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  24. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  25. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  26. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  27. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  28. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  29. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  30. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  31. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  32. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  33. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  34. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  35. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  36. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  37. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  38. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  39. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  40. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  41. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  42. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  43. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  44. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  45. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  46. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  47. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  48. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  49. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  50. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  51. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  52. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  53. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  54. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  55. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  56. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  57. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  58. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  59. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  60. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  61. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  62. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  63. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  64. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  65. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  66. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  67. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  68. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  69. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  70. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  71. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  72. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  73. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  74. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  75. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  76. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  77. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  78. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  79. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  80. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  81. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  82. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  83. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  84. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  85. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  86. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  87. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  88. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  89. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  90. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  91. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  92. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  93. Are You Going to Drink That?
  94. The Origins of ecoWURD
  95. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  96. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  97. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  98. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess
Tuesday, November 24, 2020
  1. Penn to donate $100 million to Philadelphia school district to help public school children
  2. BLACK ECOLOGIES IN TIDEWATER VIRGINIA
  3. WHAT IS “FROM THE SOURCE REPORTING?”
  4. LEADERSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
  5. THE ECOWURD SUMMIT LAUNCH
  6. National Geographic Virtual Photo Camp: Earth Stories Aimed to Elevate Indigenous Youth Voices
  7. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2020
  8. TOO MANY NATURAL GAS SPILLS
  9. GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK
  10. BLACK VOTERS ARE THE ECO-VOTERS CLIMATE ACTIVISTS ARE LOOKING FOR
  11. CANNABIS PROFIT & BLACK ECONOMY
  12. THE NATURE GAP
  13. BLACK PEOPLE NEED NATURE
  14. WHAT IS TREEPHILLY?
  15. IS AN OBSCURE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE IN HARRISBURG DOING ENOUGH?
  16. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM’S RACIST ROOTS
  17. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  18. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  19. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  20. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  21. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  22. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  23. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  24. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  25. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  26. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  27. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  28. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  29. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  30. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  31. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  32. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  33. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  34. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  35. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  36. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  37. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  38. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  39. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  40. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  41. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  42. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  43. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  44. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  45. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  46. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  47. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  48. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  49. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  50. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  51. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  52. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  53. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  54. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  55. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  56. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  57. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  58. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  59. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  60. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  61. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  62. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  63. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  64. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  65. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  66. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  67. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  68. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  69. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  70. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  71. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  72. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  73. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  74. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  75. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  76. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  77. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  78. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  79. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  80. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  81. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  82. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  83. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  84. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  85. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  86. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  87. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  88. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  89. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  90. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  91. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  92. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  93. Are You Going to Drink That?
  94. The Origins of ecoWURD
  95. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  96. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  97. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  98. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess

The planet has been so preoccupied with the pandemic that many of us forgot about the destructive effects of climate change.

 

Croix Ellison | Guest Commentary

 

The planet has spent so much time preoccupied with pandemic, for obvious reasons, that it seemed to forget all about climate change. As time moves on and more natural disasters in the form of droughts, heat waves, major floods, hurricanes and tornadoes in strange places reveal themselves, climate change will yet again strike our communities. One of its most deadly forms that we’re dealing with right now: extreme heat waves.  As Climate Central reports: “Recently, the mercury in Death Valley, Calif. climbed to a blistering 128℉ ーthe hottest temperature recorded on earth since 2017. Shortly after, NASA and NOAA announced that global temperatures from the first half of 2020 are the 2nd-hottest on record, just behind 2016. Greenhouse gas emissions are changing the chemistry of the atmosphere, causing our climate to warm to a level that modern society has never experienced.”

While many communities were forced to stay-at-home as a precaution against coronavirus infection, we were all misled into a false sense of security about climate change. More people at home meant a major drop in commutes or reasons to go outside, use a car and travel to work. That led to a major drop in emissions, especially in major cities. Major modes of transportation responsible for spewing huge amounts of carbon emissions – which are behind human-made climate change – were dramatically limited in use. The skies above major cities turned from polluted haze to a remarkably clear plate of blue. However, as Rice University’s Daniel Cohan observed: “The air is getting cleaner, although these blue skies may be temporary. But it isn’t getting cooler. The buildup of greenhouse gas pollution continues, and global temperatures are still rising. You may have seen maps in the news showing blotches of air pollution that have shrunk since economies started shutting down in the past few months. Most of those maps are plotted from satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide, or NO2, a gas that triggers respiratory illnesses such as asthma. It also reacts in the air to form other types of pollution, such as smog, haze and acid rain. [But] what about carbon dioxide, or CO2, the leading cause of global warming? As we breathe cleaner air and see less haze, is that falling too? Unfortunately, no.”

 

That will mean heat waves, which have been on the rise historically, are not going anywhere to the surprise and chagrin of many. The trend has been unstoppable since the 1960s (and coinciding with the rise in large scale manufacturing and fossil fuel use).

Scientists were already warning, as the pandemic continued that rising heat trends would continue into 2020, making it one of the hottest years on record.

 

As a result of these increasingly frequent heat waves, the nation will be facing additional health challenges, further complicating efforts to contain the pandemic. In the country’s hope to transition out of COVID-19 (we emphasize hope because infections are still, as of this BEnote, still on the rise and are potentially reaching a tipping point where they may be uncontrollable), extreme heat will be especially difficult to shelter from this year.  It will become a serious risk and will disproportionately threaten lower-income communities whose access to air conditioning is typically limited. Drexel University’s School of Public Health epidemiologist Yvonne Michael offers perspective on this in a recent WHYY (Philadelphia) report: “Noticeably, the groups that are at higher risk for the increased illness and death associated with extreme heat are very similar to the groups that are at high risk for poor outcomes with COVID-19, with the exception of the young children.”

 

Judging from the patterns of previous years, heat temperatures will continue to become hotter and longer. In addition, they will continue to manifest into a leading public health threat. In fact, heat waves are known to have caused more than 10,500 deaths in the U.S. between 2004 – 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. All racial demographic groups are impacted, but as the table below shows, Indigenous Americans, Black Americans and Latinos – in this order – are the most disproportionately impacted.

Globally, researchers have estimated that there were 166,000 heat-related deaths worldwide between 1999-2017, which surpasses the death tolls of tornadoes, hurricanes, and floods.

 

From our heat patterns over just the past fifty years, extreme temperatures look much more dangerous today.

 

Although the meaning of “extreme heat” is defined differently in every city, temperature levels have still exceeded and increased across the entire nation. Furthermore, Greenhouse Gas emissions – such as methane, which accelerates the warming – are changing our planet’s atmosphere, which is actively causing our Earth’s global temperatures to change to concerning levels our society is not used to experiencing.

 

In recent years, many parts of the country, including cities hardest hit by heat waves, have made efforts and protocols to protect citizens from the consequences of extreme heat. However, for the past few months, there has been so much emphasis on coronavirus, particularly as governments on the local, state and federal levels face the worst revenue shortages since the Great Depression, that policy makers have yet to prepare for and are not equipped to deal with another record setting heat wave.

 

Over the course of the COVID-19 quarantine, our atmosphere experienced a dip in pollution and an improvement of the environment’s air quality due to a decrease in carbon powered machines Fewer people are commuting all over the world. Traffic nowadays is limited to mostly essential trips, even as reopening happens. Some travel bans still restrict international flights. Canceled conferences, festivals, concerts and other public events have diminished tourism. Additionally, airline ridership has slumped altogether and airports are seen to be near empty. In China, a leading carbon emitter, experts estimated a 25 percent drop in carbon emissions.

Still, there is no way of taking back the emissions that have already been put into the air. As a result of the lack of effort to cut our carbon emission in previous years, there is no way to turn down our global thermostat back to the way it was naturally. Policymakers should, however, devise strategies now to reduce the impacts. That doesn’t include rolling back key legacy environmental regulations. It means they will need to expand on them while reviving major provisions in global standards such as the Paris Climate Agreement. For now, with pandemic a priority, it’s hard to predict when that will be prioritized.

 

 

CROIX ELLISON interns for the Council of State Governments Eastern Regional Conference Council on Communities of Color.