1. PENNSYLVANIA IS “WAY BEHIND” ON SOLAR. HOW DOES IT CATCH UP?
  2. Pandemic Relief For Black Farmers Still Is Not Enough
  3. A BLUEPRINT FOR THE NEXT URBANISM
  4. THAT ELECTRONIC & CLOTHING WASTE PILES UP. SO WHERE TO PUT IT?
  5. THE WOMB IS THE FIRST ENVIRONMENT
  6. A FRIDGE FOR EVERYONE WHO’S HUNGRY
  7. OLD SCHOOL FOSSIL FUEL ECONOMY VS. NEW SCHOOL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY
  8. ENVIRONMENTAL INJUSTICE IS THE TOP SOCIAL JUSTICE PRIORITY
  9. IN 2020, DID “BIG GREEN” BECOME LESS WHITE?
  10. CLIMATE ACTION CAN POWER OUR RECOVERY
  11. IN PANDEMIC, AN HBCU DOES IT BETTER
  12. A DANGEROUS LACK OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE PROTECTIONS
  13. HOW FAST CAN A BIDEN PRESIDENCY MOVE ON CLIMATE ISSUES?
  14. CRAFTING A BLACK-DRIVEN CORONAVIRUS AND CLIMATE “STIMULUS” AGENDA
  15. Penn to donate $100 million to Philadelphia school district to help public school children
  16. BLACK ECOLOGIES IN TIDEWATER VIRGINIA
  17. WHAT IS “FROM THE SOURCE REPORTING?”
  18. LEADERSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
  19. THE ECOWURD SUMMIT LAUNCH
  20. National Geographic Virtual Photo Camp: Earth Stories Aimed to Elevate Indigenous Youth Voices
  21. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2020
  22. TOO MANY NATURAL GAS SPILLS
  23. GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK
  24. BLACK VOTERS ARE THE ECO-VOTERS CLIMATE ACTIVISTS ARE LOOKING FOR
  25. CANNABIS PROFIT & BLACK ECONOMY
  26. THE NATURE GAP
  27. BLACK PEOPLE NEED NATURE
  28. WHAT IS TREEPHILLY?
  29. IS AN OBSCURE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE IN HARRISBURG DOING ENOUGH?
  30. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM’S RACIST ROOTS
  31. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  32. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  33. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  34. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  35. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  36. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  37. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  38. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  39. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  40. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  41. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  42. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  43. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  44. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  45. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  46. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  47. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  48. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  49. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  50. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  51. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  52. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  53. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  54. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  55. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  56. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  57. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  58. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  59. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  60. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  61. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  62. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  63. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  64. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  65. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  66. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  67. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  68. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  69. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  70. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  71. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  72. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  73. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  74. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  75. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  76. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  77. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  78. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  79. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  80. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  81. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  82. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  83. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  84. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  85. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  86. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  87. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  88. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  89. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  90. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  91. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  92. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  93. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  94. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  95. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  96. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  97. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  98. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  99. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  100. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  101. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  102. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  103. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  104. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  105. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  106. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  107. Are You Going to Drink That?
  108. The Origins of ecoWURD
  109. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  110. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  111. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  112. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess
Thursday, April 15, 2021
  1. PENNSYLVANIA IS “WAY BEHIND” ON SOLAR. HOW DOES IT CATCH UP?
  2. Pandemic Relief For Black Farmers Still Is Not Enough
  3. A BLUEPRINT FOR THE NEXT URBANISM
  4. THAT ELECTRONIC & CLOTHING WASTE PILES UP. SO WHERE TO PUT IT?
  5. THE WOMB IS THE FIRST ENVIRONMENT
  6. A FRIDGE FOR EVERYONE WHO’S HUNGRY
  7. OLD SCHOOL FOSSIL FUEL ECONOMY VS. NEW SCHOOL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY
  8. ENVIRONMENTAL INJUSTICE IS THE TOP SOCIAL JUSTICE PRIORITY
  9. IN 2020, DID “BIG GREEN” BECOME LESS WHITE?
  10. CLIMATE ACTION CAN POWER OUR RECOVERY
  11. IN PANDEMIC, AN HBCU DOES IT BETTER
  12. A DANGEROUS LACK OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE PROTECTIONS
  13. HOW FAST CAN A BIDEN PRESIDENCY MOVE ON CLIMATE ISSUES?
  14. CRAFTING A BLACK-DRIVEN CORONAVIRUS AND CLIMATE “STIMULUS” AGENDA
  15. Penn to donate $100 million to Philadelphia school district to help public school children
  16. BLACK ECOLOGIES IN TIDEWATER VIRGINIA
  17. WHAT IS “FROM THE SOURCE REPORTING?”
  18. LEADERSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
  19. THE ECOWURD SUMMIT LAUNCH
  20. National Geographic Virtual Photo Camp: Earth Stories Aimed to Elevate Indigenous Youth Voices
  21. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2020
  22. TOO MANY NATURAL GAS SPILLS
  23. GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK
  24. BLACK VOTERS ARE THE ECO-VOTERS CLIMATE ACTIVISTS ARE LOOKING FOR
  25. CANNABIS PROFIT & BLACK ECONOMY
  26. THE NATURE GAP
  27. BLACK PEOPLE NEED NATURE
  28. WHAT IS TREEPHILLY?
  29. IS AN OBSCURE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE IN HARRISBURG DOING ENOUGH?
  30. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM’S RACIST ROOTS
  31. “THERE’S REALLY A LOT OF QUIET SUFFERING OUT THERE
  32. “WE NEED TO GET INTO THE SUPPLY CHAIN”
  33. “AN ENVIRONMENTAL LAW THAT GIVES YOU A VOICE”
  34. URBAN PLANNING AS A TOOL FOR WHITE SUPREMACY
  35. HEAT WAVES REMIND US CLIMATE CHANGE IS STILL HERE
  36. Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land
  37. IN PANDEMIC, MAKING SURE PEOPLE EAT & HOW HBCUs HELP
  38. WE’RE NOT DONE, YET – MORE ACCOUNTABILITY IS NEEDED AT THE PES REFINERY SITE
  39. COVID-19 IS LAYING WASTE TO RECYCLING PROGRAMS
  40. THE PHILADELPHIA HEALTH EQUITY GAPS THAT COVID-19 EXPOSED
  41. THE POWER OF NEW HERBALISM
  42. THERE’S NO RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
  43. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit
  44. ecoWURD Earth Day Summit 2020 Press Release
  45. Too Much Food At Farms, Too Little Food At Stores
  46. THE LINK BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION & COVID-19
  47. CORONAVIRUS REVEALS WHY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IS STILL THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME
  48. FROM KATRINA TO CORONAVIRUS, WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
  49. COVID-19 SHOWS A BIGGER IMPACT WHERE BLACK PEOPLE LIVE
  50. THE CORONAVIRUS CONVERSATION HAS GOT TO GET A LOT MORE INCLUSIVE THAN THIS
  51. MEDIA’S CLIMATE CHANGE COVERAGE KEEPS BLACK PEOPLE OUT OF IT
  52. “WE DON’T HAVE A CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS”
  53. PHILADELPHIA HAS A FOOD ECONOMY
  54. HOW URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY IN U.S. CITIES
  55. MAPPING THE LINK BETWEEN INCARCERATION & FOOD INSECURITY
  56. PHILLY’S JAILS ARE, LITERALLY, MAKING PEOPLE SICK
  57. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit 2019
  58. ecoWURD Environmental Justice Summit
  59. “We Can’t Breathe: Zulene Mayfield’s Lifelong War with Waste ‘Managers’”
  60. “Is The Black Press Reporting on Environmental Issues?” by David Love
  61. “The Dangerous Connection Between Climate Change & Food” an interview with Jacqueline Patterson and Adrienne Hollis
  62. “An Oil Refinery Explosion That Was Never Isolated” by Charles Ellison
  63. “Philly Should Be Going ‘Community Solar'” an interview w/ PA Rep. Donna Bullock
  64. “Is The Litter Index Enough?” an interview w/ Nic Esposito
  65. “How Sugarcane Fires in Florida Are Making Black People Sick” an interview w/ Frank Biden
  66. Philly Farm Social – Video and Pictures
  67. #PHILLYFARMSOCIAL GETS REAL IN THE FIELD
  68. THE LACK OF DIVERSE LEADERS IN THE GREEN SPACE Environmental Advocacy Organizations – especially the “Big Green” – Really Need More Black & Brown People in Senior Positions
  69. PLASTIC BAG BANS CAN BACKFIRE … WHEN YOU HAVE OTHER PLASTICS TO CHOOSE FROM
  70. WE REALLY NEED POLITICAL STRATEGISTS LEADING ON CLIMATE CHANGE – NOT ACADEMICS
  71. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS IN A MUCH MORE CLIMATIC WORLD
  72. A SMALL GERMANTOWN NON-PROFIT “TRADES FOR A DIFFERENCE”
  73. IS PHILLY BLAMING ITS TRASH & RECYCLING CRISIS ON BLACK PEOPLE?
  74. BUT WHAT DOES THE GREEN NEW DEAL MEAN FOR BLACK PEOPLE?
  75. HOW GREEN IS PHILLY’S “GREENWORKS” PLAN?
  76. The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy event recap #ecoWURD #phillyisgreen
  77. Bike-friendly cities should be designed for everyone, not just for wealthy white cyclists
  78. RENAMING “GENTRIFICATION”
  79. FOUR GOVERNORS, ONE URBAN WATERSHED IN NEED OF ACTION
  80. JUST HOW BAD IS THE AIR HURTING PHILLY’S BLACK FAMILIES?
  81. EcoWURD Presents:The Future of Work in Philly’s Green Economy
  82. IF YOU ARE LOW-INCOME OR HOMELESS, THE POLAR VORTEX IS LIKE A FORM OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
  83. NOT JUST FLINT: THE WATER CRISIS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY
  84. DO THE TRAINS STOP RUNNING? THE SHUTDOWN’S IMPACT ON MASS TRANSIT
  85. BLACK WOMEN & THE TROUBLE WITH BABY POWDER
  86. A WHITE COLLAR CRIME VICTIMIZING NICETOWN
  87. IN NORTH CAROLINA, CLIMATE CHANGE & VOTER SUPPRESSION WORKED HAND-IN-HAND
  88. LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WOULD GAIN THE MOST FROM GREEN ROOFS
  89. YOUR OWN HOOD: CLOSING THE GENERATIONAL GREEN DIVIDE IN BLACK PHILADELPHIA
  90. THE PRICE OF WATER: LITERAL & FIGURATIVE THIRST AT WORK
  91. THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT TRUMP DIDN’T WANT YOU TO SEE? YEAH, WELL, IT’S THE LAW
  92. RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITIES ARE MORE VULNERABLE TO WILDFIRES
  93. NO IFS, ANDS OR BUTTS Philly Has a Cigarette Butt Problem
  94. HOW SUSTAINABLE CAN PHILLY GET?
  95. USING AFROFUTURISM TO BUILD THE KIND OF WORLD YOU WANT
  96. UNCOVERING PHILLY’S HIDDEN TOXIC DANGERS …
  97. WILL THE ENVIRONMENT DRIVE VOTERS TO THE POLLS? (PART I)
  98. ARE PHILLY SCHOOLS READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?
  99. 🎧 SEPTA CREATES A GAS PROBLEM IN NORTH PHILLY
  100. 🎧 BREAKING THE GREEN RETAIL CEILING
  101. That’s Nasty: The Cost of Trash in Philly
  102. 🎧 How Can You Solarize Philly?
  103. 🎧 “The Environment Should Be an Active, Living Experience”
  104. Philly’s Lead Crisis Is Larger Than Flint’s
  105. Despite What You Heard, Black Millennials Do Care About the Environment
  106. Hurricanes Always Hurt Black Folks the Most
  107. Are You Going to Drink That?
  108. The Origins of ecoWURD
  109. We Seriously Need More Black Climate Disaster Films
  110. 🎧 Why Should Philly Care About a Pipeline?
  111. 🎧 Not Just Hotter Days Ahead… Costly Ones Too
  112. Philly’s Big and Dangerous Hot Mess

Pandemic and climate crisis have a lot more in common than we think – they’re both forms of environmental injustice

 

Charles Ellison | ecoWURD | Managing Editor

 

With the 2020 election over, and a new Biden administration expected in 2021, there will be more than a few urgent priorities dropped in the new president’s lap. At the top of that list will be coronavirus, of course: from how to manage it to eradicating and then helping the economy recover from it in the post-pandemic landscape.

 

However, there will be two big priorities to contend with. As urgent as putting a lid on the pandemic is the growing threat of climate change as it evolves into climate crisis. This year found us all witnessing a surrealistic, sci fi movie-like convergence of numerous social fabric destabilization events. Of the more prominent were uncontrollable climate-related disasters: a record hurricane season just ending, epic wildfires devouring entire states and record-cracking heat waves. As all of this happened, adding new stresses and strains on emergency management systems, we also witnessed very little federal government interest in commanding an effective national response. Cities and states, along with their constituents, were left to their own devices.

 

The expectation that the incoming Biden administration plans to address both 1) coronavirus and 2) climate change aggressively is a promising sign.  How much fruit those efforts bear, still, will largely depend on other political factors such as the political composition of Congress and how much of a role state and local policymakers play – not to mention how far the private sector goes without stalling itself over “free market” worries.

 

To arrive at success, equity and inclusion should be included as key benchmarks. Both coronavirus and environmental climate concerns are environmental justice issues; they both meet at the intersection of racial and vulnerable population imperatives – and they are both determined by struggles over the spaces people live in. Communities devastated the most by both sets of catastrophes, particularly Black communities, could insert themselves as leaders on both issues, setting the agenda and pace for success – and not only as primary victims and targets of the circumstances created by these disasters, but as primary subject matter experts.

 

Environmental injustice is fast evolving into, arguably, the most significant problem of the 21st century – indeed the most urgent problem facing historically marginalized Black people in the United States (and throughout the global Black diaspora for that matter).  Stressors triggered by climate calamities and public health crises are creating conditions for increased income inequality and hyper-scarcity. These conditions make existing challenges like racism much worse.

 

Coronavirus and climate crisis are both forms of environmental injustice. The extent of coronavirus’ destruction on Black, Brown and Indigenous communities depends greatly on proximity: where do those communities live, are the living spaces and neighborhoods dense, thereby disallowing preventative measures such as ‘social distancing?’ How much reliable, well-resourced and responsive healthcare do they have access to? How prevalent is chronic disease in those communities since COVID-19 infection can aggravate what are called ‘co-morbidities?” In the case of climate crisis, it’s also a war over space or the spaces people live in: Are the places where people live most vulnerable to events like heat waves, flooding and hurricanes?  Can these communities access resources to escape impending climate events – or do they have enough assets (like home and flood insurance) to respond to those events when they happen?  Do these climate-related events prevent access to quality healthcare?

 

With both issues growing and intersecting, impacted communities are in a perfect position to lead through agenda-setting. Extra advocacy on coronavirus public health and economic relief can lead to progress on a wide range of issues, especially as it relates to healthcare, income disposition and education innovations. Pandemic recovery shouldn’t just mean the end of COVID-19 through vaccine distribution, it should also entail the end of health disparities, mass unemployment and academic achievement gaps that are exacerbated as a result of high infection rates. “We talk a lot about the average 2 deaths per day resulting from police violence. But we never really mention the more than 274 deaths per day, on average, attributed to some form of racial bias in healthcare,” Kevin Ahmad-Jenkins, a social epidemiologist who lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, tells ecoWURD. “That results in an estimated annual loss of more than $1 trillion … that we know of.”

 

“But, there are no protests. We need to get people to care about the statistics.”

 

Resolving those social and economic justice issues in ambitious coronavirus “stimulus” could also be bolstered by climate crisis-driven stimulus. Both “Marshall Plan”-style relief packages should contain features that simultaneously 1) invest in communities while 2) eliminating the disparities and discrimination they’re constantly faced with. A “climate crisis” stimulus would include the large-scale creation of new clean energy and so-called “green” economies that are centered around complete environmental health and remediation. That translates into greater public health returns, job growth and wealth generation through the incubation of Black-owned sustainable start-ups. Recent research shows that the expansion of “green” or “clean energy jobs” actually reduces wage inequality. “Mean hourly wages in each major category of green jobs (clean energy production, energy efficiency, and environmental management), were above the national average by at least $2 per hour,” cites Amanda Novello and Greg Carlock in a Century Foundation briefing. “Wages in each category were also at or above $15 per hour for the lowest decile of earners, at least $4 per hour above earnings at the low-end for all workers nationally. Out of all occupations nationally, over 30 percent of workers earn under $15 per hour, whereas that figure is around only 4 percent of green workers. Notably, in effect, there is less income inequality within green jobs than the national average, despite there being lower educational requirements, on average, than jobs nationally.”

 

This is crucial in a pandemic moment where more than 40 percent of Black-owned businesses have already closed this year alone, with more expected.  A smart mix of coronavirus and climate crisis stimulus, dominated by a Black “Health, Wealth and Education” agenda, can offer an opportunity for these communities to become frontline stewards of the environment and public health as they re-invent themselves into first wave participants in a re-energized economy.